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Should Authors Credit Illustrators in Their Books?

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Should Authors Credit Illustrators in Their Books?
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As an author, you may be wondering whether you should credit illustrators who worked on your book. After all, they played an important role in bringing your story to life, and you want to make sure they get the recognition they deserve. But where should you place the credit, and how should it be formatted? Here’s what you need to know.

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Credit Illustrators: The Case for Crediting Illustrators

First, let’s consider why you might want to credit your illustrator. For one, it’s a way to show your appreciation for their hard work and talent. Illustrators are often unsung heroes in the publishing process, and giving them credit can go a long way in building a positive working relationship.

In addition, including the illustrator’s name in your book can help promote their work and build their reputation. This is especially true if your book is successful and reaches a wide audience. By acknowledging the illustrator’s contribution, you can help them gain new fans and potentially attract new clients.

Where to Place the Credit

So, where should you place the illustrator credit in your book? There are a few options to consider. One is to include it on the cover of the book, alongside your name as the author. This is a common practice for picture books and other works that rely heavily on illustrations.

Another option is to place the credit on the title page of the book, which typically appears on the verso (left-hand) side of the copyright page. This is a more subtle approach, but still gives the illustrator the recognition they deserve.

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Formatting the Credit

When it comes to formatting the illustrator credit, there are a few different styles to choose from. One common format is to simply list the illustrator’s name below your own on the cover or title page. For example:

Written by Jane Smith

Illustrated by John Doe

Alternatively, you could use the phrase “with illustrations by” to give the illustrator credit. For example:

Written by Jane Smith With illustrations by John Doe

Another option is to use the word “and” between your name and the illustrator’s name, as in:

Written by Jane Smith and illustrated by John Doe

Ultimately, the format you choose will depend on your personal preference and the style of your book.

Conclusion

Crediting illustrators in your book is a way to show your appreciation for their hard work and talent, as well as help promote their work and build their reputation. Whether you choose to place the credit on the cover or title page, and how you format it, will depend on your personal preferences and the style of your book. But whatever you choose, be sure to give your illustrator the recognition they deserve.

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